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Abraham Lincoln and Family
Mary Todd Lincoln

Mary Todd Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln’s White House

Abraham Lincoln and Family

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Quote of the Day

I hold that while man exists it is his duty to improve not only his own condition, but to assist in ameliorating mankind; and therefore, I will simply say that I am for those means which will give the greatest good to the greatest number.”– Address at Cincinnati, February 12, 1861

Daily Story

Lincoln Reading
Sam Brown’s Credit

[The Detroit Free Press, 9 January 1898, interviews 88-year-old Richard W. Thompson who recalls AL’s opinion of one claim:] I will say of your case that it suggests to me a story I once heard about Sam Brown, lawyer, in Illinois. This…

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Abraham Lincoln in Depth

lincoln-moods
Abraham Lincoln’s Moods
“Lincoln was a curious – mysterious – quite an incomprehensible man,” wrote William H. Herndon shortly before he died... Read more   View more articles

Cartoon Corner

lincoln-moods President Lincoln enjoyed humor. Many Americans enjoyed making fun of the President. Some of the most recognizable cartoons were published in Harper’s Weekly, a New York City periodical ... Read more

The true issue or

Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass led an unusual life.

John A. Dix (1798-1879)

John A. Dix (1798-1879)

Dix served as Secretary of the Treasury under President James Buchanan form January to March 1861 after southerners deserted Buchanan’s cabinet.

Bipartisan Friendship

Bipartisan Friendship

A fellow Sangamon County rail-splitter, George Close, noted that Mr. Lincoln’s early appeal was bipartisan.

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Lincoln by littles



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Lincoln "by littles"

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Lincoln "by littles":

"The self-tutored lawyer from Illinois could not understand those 'don't care' politicians, such as Senator Stephen A. Douglas, who pretended indifference to involuntary servitude."

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