Quiz of the Week


Test your knowledge about:
Abraham Lincoln and Massachusetts
Charles Sumner

Charles Sumner
Abraham Lincoln’s White House

Quote of the Day

I am greatly obliged to you, and to all who have come forward at the call of their country.”– Speech to the One Hundred Sixty-fourth Ohio Regiment, August 22, 1864

Daily Story

Lincoln Reading
Chase and the Chin Fly

“My brother and I were once ploughing corn n a Kentucky farm, I driving the horse, and he holding the plough. The horse was lazy; abut on one occasion he rushed across the field so that I, with long legs, could scarcely keep pace with him. On…

Read the full story

Abraham Lincoln in Depth

lincoln-moods
Abraham Lincoln’s Moods
“Lincoln was a curious – mysterious – quite an incomprehensible man,” wrote William H. Herndon shortly before he died... Read more   View more articles

Cartoon Corner

lincoln-moods President Lincoln enjoyed humor. Many Americans enjoyed making fun of the President. Some of the most recognizable cartoons were published in Harper’s Weekly, a New York City periodical ... Read more

Congressional Action and Inaction

Congressional Action and Inaction

President Lincoln came under considerable pressure from Radical Republicans to take action to free slaves in areas in rebellion against the Federal government.

The true issue or

William H. Seward (1801-1872)

“Not that Mr. Seward personally, is not, eminently qualified for the place, in talents, Knowledge, experience and urbanity of manners; but, at the South, whether justly or unjustly, there is a bitter prejudice against him…”

Mr. Lincoln and Eliza P. Gurney

Mr. Lincoln and Eliza P. Gurney

English-born widow of Quaker leader Joseph John Gurney

An American History Project of
The Lehrman Institute.
Please acknowledge
when using this research.

Lincoln by littles



Available for
$2.99 on
Amazon Kindle

Lincoln "by littles"

Excerpts from
Lincoln "by littles":

"The self-tutored lawyer from Illinois could not understand those 'don't care' politicians, such as Senator Stephen A. Douglas, who pretended indifference to involuntary servitude."

Please visit our Lehrman Institute Sites