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  • 1864 Election
  •   - Abraham's dream!--"Coming events cast their shadows before"
      - Slow & steady wins the race
      -  Platforms illustrated
      - The grave of the union
      - Union and liberty! And union and slavery!
      - How Columbia receives McLellan's Salutation from the Chicago Platform
      - This ticket good for a free passage up Salt River, boats will leave Copperhead Headquarters every ten minutes, the McClellan Brass Band will be in attendance to play the Rogue's March, good during the war
      - "I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest . . . where be your gibes now?--"Hamlet, Act IV, Scene 1"
      - The true issue or "Thats whats the matter"
      - Jeff Davis' November Nightmare
      - The soldier's song--Unionism vs. Copperheadism
      - How free ballot is protected!
      - The old bull dog on the right track
      - Platforms illustrated
      - Political caricature no. 1. The grave of the Union. Or Major Jack Downing's dream. Drawn by Zeke
      - Political caricature no. 2. Miscegenation or the millennium of abolitionism
      - Political caricature no. 3. The abolition catastrophe, or the November smash-up
      - Political caricature. No. 4. The miscegenation ball
      - Behind the scenes
      - Deplorable Result of Lincoln’s Election
      - A little game of bagatelle, between Old Abe the rail splitter & Little Mac the gunboat general
      - Long Abraham Lincoln a Little Longer
      - McClellan Tries to Ride Two Horses
      - Policeman Lincoln Orders McClellan Off the Capitol Grounds
      - The Old Bulldog on the right track
      - The true issue or ‘That's what's the matter’
      - Your Plan and Mine
      - I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest . . . where be your gibes now?
      - Little Mac in His Great Two Horse Act
      - The Copperhead Plan for Subjugating the South
      - UNION AND LIBERTY! UNION AND SLAVERY!
      - Major-General "Little Mac" answers the question (often put) "Why don't he resign his Major-Generalship?"
      - The Hardest Shell Yet
      - A Parcel for the White House; or the Presidential Vote
      - A Presidential Candidate Simmering Down
      - Don’t Swap Horses
      - Humble or Slavery Pie
      - In for His Second Innings
      - May the Best Man Win-Uncle Sam Reviewing the Army of Candidates for the Presidential Chair
      - S__d, the Bootblack, Gives an Opinion
      - The Good Uncle and the Naughty Boy
      - The Giant Majority Carrying Abe Lincoln Safely Through Troubled Waters to the White House
      - The Next Presidency – A Marvelous Prophecy
      - The Political Blondin
      - The Rival Bill Posters
      - Leading, Following, Rebellion
      - The Giant Majority Carrying Abe Lincoln Safely Through Troubled Waters to the White House
      - Platforms Illustrated
      - How Columbia receives McClellan’s Salutation from the Chicago Platform
      - Political Siamese Twins
      - How free ballot is protected!
      - Don’t You Wish You May Get It
      - Old Abe’s Last Joke
      - Presidential Cobblers and Wire-Pullers Measuring and Estimating Lincoln’s Shoes
      - Poor McRobinson Crusoe!
      - Freedom's immortal triumph! Finale of the Jeff Davis Die-nasty
      - Election Day
      - Exit Abe
  • Assassination & Funeral
  • Secession
  • Foreign Policy
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    Cartoon Corner
    A little game of bagatelle, between Old Abe the rail splitter & Little Mac the gunboat general

    A little game of bagatelle, between Old Abe the rail splitter & Little Mac the gunboat general

    Title: A little game of bagatelle, between Old Abe the rail splitter & Little Mac the gunboat general

    Year: 1864

    Creator: Currier and Ives

    Description: The contest for the presidency in 1864 is depicted as a game of bagatelle (a game similar to pool) between Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln and Democrat George B. McClellan.

    Lincoln (left) holds a cue "Baltimore" (the site of the Republican national convention) and is about to shoot a ball on "The Union Board." He says to running mate Andrew Johnson (upper right), "I'll do the best I can Andy, I can do no more."
    Johnson encourages him, "Hurrah for our side, go ahead Old Abe! O aint he bully on the bagatelle? you're only got a few more to make, It's A Sure Thing!!" Johnson points to the scoreboard which reads "Nix" for the "Copper" (i.e., Copperheads or Peace Democrats). The Union side of the board is blank.
    At left McClellan, dressed as a child, holds a cue "Chicago" (site of the Democratic national convention) and stands on a toppling "Chicago Platform," which appears to have been given a nudge by Lincoln's foot. A "Peace" plank has fallen from it. (McClellan was never entirely committed to the "peace at any price" principle advocated by Copperhead leader Clement L. Vallandigham.) McClellan complains, "This Cue 'is too heavy! and the' Platform's 'shakey!! O! O! I want to go back in the yard!!"
    His running mate George H. Pendleton (far left) retorts impatiently, "O see here. We cant stand this! Old Abe's getting in all the pots on the board, this game will have to be played over again or there'l be a fight, THAT'S CERTAIN."
    At the far right Vallandigham sits with crossed legs, saying to McClellan, "There is nothing the matter with the Cue or the Platform, you had the first red and didn't make anything, now he'll win the game."
    Union general Ulysses S. Grant smokes a pipe and stands near the middle of the table. He advises McClellan, " . . . you travel too near the ground to play on this board, better surrender UNCONDITIONALLY."
    A grinning black waiter with a tray of drinks watches Pendleton and McClellan.
    In the foreground are a cat named "Miss Cegenation" (i.e., miscegenation) and a black dog, tied together at the tails by a string attached to a kettle. They chase two rats, "Old Lea" and "Wood," across a paper holding "Caces Sugar Plumbs."


    URL: http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/PPALL:@field(NUMBER+@band(cph+3a05710))

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